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12 of the Most Stubborn Dogs Who Are Extremely Difficult to Train

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We have selected some of the featured dogs that are particularly difficult to train, the reasons for the challenges and tips to make this years of training a little easier for the owner and the dog.

Mastiff

There is no doubt that the mastiff is one of those dog breeds that has a great personality. However, training even the most beautiful dogs can be difficult, and the mastiff is no exception. According to the AKC, this dog benefits most from “gentle training”. The owners should make the mastiff training as entertaining as possible. Otherwise, they are less likely to stay interested. It is also recommended that owners train them early to improve social skills and obedience.

Labrador retriever

The Labrador Retriever is undoubtedly one of the most popular breeds in the United States and not as obedient as you might think. In the first two years of its life, the laboratory tends to chew everything it touches. In addition, this dog can pull a lot when walking if it is not properly leashed. In addition to training, there is also the problem that Labrador Retrievers lose a lot, not to mention the likelihood that they will smell due to their double oily layer.

Newfoundland

In contrast to the Rottweilers, the Newfoundland dog is very gentle despite its size. Make no mistake, they can certainly cause great pain to the owner due to their size. This can be avoided if Newfoundland trains properly on a leash. Because they spill a lot twice a year and drool frequently, they ensure that your home requires a lot more cleaning and maintenance. Not to mention the fact that they’re more likely to drop things, including children.

Kerry Blue Terrier

If there is a breed of dog known to follow the owner’s rules on its own terms, it must be the Kerry Blue Terrier. “Kerry is extremely intelligent and therefore requires training,” wrote the Kerry Blue Terrier Foundation. “It is a breed that quickly learns where and under what circumstances it can escape without obeying.” For this reason kennels recommend that Kerry blue terriers are matched with owners who are firm.

Weimaraner

What makes Weimaraner one of the most complex breeds is its high level of intelligence and energy. In many ways, it’s a deadly combination. “The Weimaraner love movement and should have a lot of it and a lot of time with their people,” wrote the AKC. Given that Weimaraners can show the characteristics of puppies in the first two to four years of their lives, owners have no choice but to be firm and to know when to say yes and no.

Akita

Without a doubt one of the most loyal races in the world, the Akita will risk its own body for its owners in due course. However, you have to earn their loyalty and this could only be possible if you had them since they were puppies. Training times can be extremely difficult for Akitas, especially since they tend to move away like puppies. However, once you gain their trust, they will always be behind you.

dachshund

Although their sausage-shaped bodies don’t seem like a big deal, Dachshunds have a lot more than you see. Even in the face of dogs that are much larger than them, a Daschund remains firm and protects the one who leads them. It is recommended to remove them once a day. Because of its reputation as a hunter, however, a dachshund will always hunt what it finds when it crawls in the garden. So be patient with them.

Shiba Inu

It seems that the more independent a dog is, the more difficult it is to train it, and the Shiba Inu fits this description perfectly. If they are not properly trained, they can act aggressively towards other dogs. In the end, the owners must be ready to train Shiba Inus at a young age. However, it is not that easy. It takes a lot of love and patience to train these beautiful dogs. It will take a few years for the results to be available.

Afghan dog

The Afghan Hound is another of these dog breeds that is undoubtedly an adorable giant. It is much more sophisticated than its appearance suggests. Because of its reputation as an independent thinker, the Afghan tends to go his own way unlike his owner. However, according to AKC, owners will likely be able to train these dogs with a good amount of positive boosters, especially treats. It also helps to start exercising when you are young.

beagle

Don’t let the eyes of beagle puppies fool you all your life, their first years can be extremely difficult for owners. While having fun at home, training a beagle can be one of life’s real secrets. They tend to be pretty mean. “Beagles are temporarily obedient at best because they are independent, which is common in most dogs,” wrote the AKC. There are two traits that all beagle owners must have: being active and patient.

Chow Chow

Although the Chow Chow looks more like a teddy bear than a traditional dog, they aren’t the cutest creatures in the world either. In fact, AKC has described Chow Chow with personalities that resemble those of a cat. The organization also described them as “independent, persistent, and less strong-willed than other breeds.” However, like many other breeds on this list, the Chow Chow needs a permanent owner who is willing to help them get in touch with other dogs at a young age.

Pekinese

You may be able to put these little things in a box, but that doesn’t solve all of your problems. Even though small, Pekingese dogs are extremely intelligent. As a result, at a certain point in time, they tend to know what they want and what they don’t want. “Training should start as early as possible and continue as the puppy grows,” wrote the AKC. Despite its intelligence, Pekingese take longer to learn than other races.

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